Big heart seeking

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We know this may be a frightening time if you've recently had a heart attack. If you need support, please call our Heart Helpline on to speak to a cardiac nurse. If you or someone you love is living with a heart and circulatory condition, or you're at increased risk from coronavirus Covid , visit our coronavirus for regularly updated information on a range of topics.

Get coronavirus information. This is common in the elderly or people with diabetes, as the condition can cause nerve damage which affects how you feel pain. Learn more about heart attack symptoms. Whether or not you have coronavirus symptoms , it's essential to dial if you have symptoms that could be a heart attack, or if your heart symptoms get worse. We are hearing that fewer people are being seen in hospital with heart attacks in recent weeks, which suggests that people are not seeking help when they should do.

If you have any of the symptoms described above, you should call Don't delay because you think hospitals are too busy - the NHS still has systems in place to treat people for heart attacks. If you delay, you are more likely to suffer serious heart damage and more likely to need intensive care and to spend longer in hospital. Find out more. We know that women tend to wait longer before calling after experiencing heart attack symptoms.

In the UK, an average of three women die of coronary heart disease every hour, many of them due to a heart attack. You dramatically reduce your chance of survival if you don't call straight away. Learn more about women and heart attacks. Most heart attacks are caused by coronary heart disease CHD.

CHD causes your coronary arteries to become narrowed by a gradual build-up of fatty deposits called atheroma. If a piece of atheroma breaks off, a blood clot forms around this to try and repair the damage to the artery wall. This causes your heart muscle to be starved of blood and oxygen. The ambulance team will do an electrocardiogram ECG to detect whether you're having a heart attack.

You might hear a heart attack being called acute coronary syndrome, myocardial infarction MI or coronary thrombosis while you're at hospital. Jean Peet had a heart attack while putting on her walking boots one Sunday morning during lockdown in May Hear her story and other real experiences from people living with heart and circulatory diseases. Hear Jean's story. Quick treatment to get the blood flowing to your heart muscle again is important. This can reduce the amount of permanent damage to your heart and save your life.

After a heart attack, you should be referred to cardiac rehabilitation, or cardiac rehab for short. The aim is to support and guide you on your road to recovery. Each group is slightly different, but involves regular assessments, advice and talks from experts, exercise sessions and group discussions.

Learn more about cardiac rehab. You'll usually stay in hospital for about two to five days after having a heart attack. This depends on what treatment you've had and how well you're recovering. Many people make a full recovery after a heart attack, but you might not be able to do everything you used to. Going to cardiac rehabilitation can help you get back to normal as quickly as possible.

A heart attack can be a frightening experience and it can take time to come to terms with what's happened. For support and advice, visit our emotional support . Practical matters like driving, going back to work or finances might be a worry after a heart attack. You can get support and advice on these topics and more on our practical support . We often speak about the part risk factors play in causing heart and circulatory conditions. There are some risk factors you can control, and some you can't.

Get advice on healthy living. If you've already had a heart attack, your risk of having another one is greatly reduced with the correct treatment. Take the medicines your doctors have prescribed and follow a healthy lifestyle. Heart attack symptoms. Women and heart attacks. Recovering after a heart attack. Primary angioplasty. Cardiac rehabilitation. Keeping your heart healthy.

This short illustrated leaflet explains the symptoms and causes of a heart attack and the possible treatments for it. It also tells you what to expect from the recovery process and answers some common questions. Tests are used to diagnose a heart condition or to see how healthy your heart is. Find out what to expect from some of the most common tests. You may be having planned or emergency treatment. We explain what to expect, how it will help and what will happen afterwards. Being diagnosed or living with a heart or circulatory condition can be overwhelming. Find out about the practical and emotional challenges, along with support for you and your family.

Support Info hub: Adult congenital heart disease Reducing your cholesterol Cardiac rehabilitation at home Emotional support and wellbeing Listen to our podcast Manage your blood pressure at home Managing your heart failure Support for carers Taking control of your weight Practical support Support if you've given CPR Healthy living Children and Young people Women with a heart condition Genetic Information Service Support groups and online communities. How your heart works Your heart rate. Fundraising Take on one of our challenges Fundraise MyMarathon Ideas, tips and resources Speak to your local fundraising manager Remember a loved one with a tribute fund Fundraise for a special occasion Pay in your fundraising Become a local fundraising volunteer Become a corporate partner Virtual Collections.

Become a corporate partner Our current partners Ways to work together Why support us. Retail customer services Safety measures Donate safely to our clothing and book shops Donate safely to our home stores Donate safely using our house clearance service Operating a safe delivery service for our home stores Storage of paid for goods Refunds and exchanges Payment and receipts Become a Gift Aider . What we do Who we are Our research Our research Research funding data visualised Heart Statistics Our research successes Respond to the comprehensive spending review Researchers ing the fight Heart conditions research Heart statistics visualised Circulatory conditions research Our clinical trials Research Excellence and Accelerator Awards Risk factor research Our Professors Miles Frost Fund Our science image competition.

Our strategy Changes we want to see in the world We fund research to save and improve lives We work with patients and the public for better health and care We grow support and income We strive for excellence. Enter keyword s. Back Support Info hub: Adult congenital heart disease Reducing your cholesterol Cardiac rehabilitation at home Emotional support and wellbeing Listen to our podcast Manage your blood pressure at home Managing your heart failure Support for carers Taking control of your weight Practical support Support if you've given CPR Healthy living Children and Young people Women with a heart condition Genetic Information Service Support groups and online communities.

Back How your heart works Your heart rate. Back Fundraising Take on one of our challenges Fundraise MyMarathon Ideas, tips and resources Speak to your local fundraising manager Remember a loved one with a tribute fund Fundraise for a special occasion Pay in your fundraising Become a local fundraising volunteer Become a corporate partner Virtual Collections. Back Become a corporate partner Our current partners Ways to work together Why support us.

Back Retail customer services Safety measures Donate safely to our clothing and book shops Donate safely to our home stores Donate safely using our house clearance service Operating a safe delivery service for our home stores Storage of paid for goods Refunds and exchanges Payment and receipts Become a Gift Aider . Back Our strategy Changes we want to see in the world We fund research to save and improve lives We work with patients and the public for better health and care We grow support and income We strive for excellence.

Have you recently had a heart attack? Looking for information on coronavirus Covid? Should I still call or go to hospital if I'm worried about my health? The Ticker Tapes Podcast Jean Peet had a heart attack while putting on her walking boots one Sunday morning during lockdown in May Cardiac rehabilitation After a heart attack, you should be referred to cardiac rehabilitation, or cardiac rehab for short. Related links Heart attack symptoms Women and heart attacks Recovering after a heart attack Primary angioplasty Cardiac rehabilitation Keeping your heart healthy.

Heart attack - your quick guide This short illustrated leaflet explains the symptoms and causes of a heart attack and the possible treatments for it. Get this publication. Speak to others with heart conditions by ing a support group or online community. up to our Heart Matters magazine and online information packed with health and lifestyle advice. our HealthUnlocked community. Tests for heart and circulatory conditions Tests are used to diagnose a heart condition or to see how healthy your heart is.

Treatments for heart and circulatory conditions You may be having planned or emergency treatment. Support Being diagnosed or living with a heart or circulatory condition can be overwhelming.

Big heart seeking

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